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Windows codename Fiji, or Vista R2 is now scheduled to deliver before Windows Vienna. Windows Fiji is planned to be released in 2008, while Windows Vienna had its estimated release date in 2010.

Windows codename Fiji, or Vista R2 is now scheduled to deliver before Windows Vienna. Windows Fiji is planned to be released in 2008, while Windows Vienna had its estimated release date in 2010. Due to the recent Windows Vista delay the domino effect could cause these other two versions of Windows to also be delayed, however the schedule disruption will not be significant.

 

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Windows 7 Showcased By Microsoft

For PDC 2008, Microsoft is releasing screenshots of Windows 7 that confirm the rumors of a new taskbar, start menu and fewer warnings.

New screenshots of the Windows 7 operating system have been released by Microsoft, showing off a new Taskbar that groups application instances together, no longer showing their name but only their icon; when hovering over the icon, thumbnails of applications in that group will pop-up. The order of the applications can now also be changed.

The Start Menu suffered a small redesign and has been reorganized to show frequent and recent applications on the right pane.

A gadget-enabled desktop that replaces the Vista sidebar; all of Vista’s sidebar gadgets will be compatible with the new gadget-enabled desktop.

Alerts will not be seen as often in Windows 7 as when using Windows Vista. The new Action Center allows you to control the pop-up balloons that show up in the System Tray. All the messages will now queue up in the Action Center and can be resolved by the user when ready, or the user can shut them down alltogether.

Tablet PCs will benefit from Windows 7′s multitouch capabilities. Other new features in the showcased Windows 7 version include an easier home networks setup process, and a new way to display a folder’s content (typically when it contains pictures and other media,) called Library.

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On Thursday, the Release Candidate version of Windows 7 was prematurely made available for download on Microsoft.com, as Microsoft is in the process of drafting up the final version of the operating system to be released later this year.

The page that made the download possible for both 32 bit and 64 bit systems, has since been removed, since it’s only supposed to be made available to the public in the month of May. The testing program will remain open for approximately one month, until June, but the build itself won’t expire for another year.


The following content was made available by Microsoft on the download page:

Windows 7 Release Candidate
Published: May 2009

Download instructions

Welcome to Windows 7 Release Candidate (RC) testing. We’re on our way to Windows 7, and the RC is a great opportunity for IT professionals like you to take Windows 7 and begin testing it in your real environment. You get to see what’s coming, and we get to see if our changes and fixes from the Beta testing are working correctly. We want to encourage you to install and actively test the RC code. This will help us ensure Windows 7 is the best possible release, and help you get ready for Windows 7 deployment.
Here’s what you need to know:

  • This is pre-release software, so please read the following to get an idea of the risks and key things you need to know before you try the RC.
  • You don’t need to rush to get Windows 7 RC. The RC release will be available at least through June 2009 and we’re not limiting the number of product keys, so you have plenty of time.
  • Watch the calendar. Windows 7 RC will expire on June 1, 2010. So if you install the RC release you’ll either need to upgrade to the final version of Windows 7 before that date, or install a prior version of Windows. (For more about installing Windows, see installation instructions.
  • Protect your PC and data . Be sure to back up your data and please don’t test Windows 7 RC on your primary home or business PC.
  • Technical details/updates: before installing the RC please read the Release Notes, and Things to Know for important information about the release.
  • Keep up with the news. You can keep up with general technical information and news by following the Springboard Series blog or Windows team blog. Want technical guidance, tips, and tools? Visit the Springboard Series on TechNet.
  • And, you can get non-technical news, tips, and offers on the Springboard Series on TechNet
  • Keep your PC updated: Be sure turn on automatic updates in Windows Update in case we publish updates for the RC.
  • Microsoft Partners: Learn more about Windows 7on the Microsoft Partner Portal.


Here’s what you need to have:

  •     Internet access (to download Windows 7 RC and get updates)
  •     A PC with these minimum recommended specifications:

                    1 GHz 32-bit or 64-bit processor or higher
1 GB of system memory or more
16 GB of available disk space
Support for DirectX 9 graphics with 128 MB memory (to enable the Aero theme)
DVD-R/W Drive

Please note these specifications could change. And, some product features of Windows 7, such as the ability to watch and record live TV or navigation through the use of “touch,” may require advanced or additional hardware.
Get the download

The 32- and 64-bit versions of Windows 7 RC are available in five languages: English, German, Japanese, French, and Spanish. (Note: The RC version will not be available in Hindi or Arabic.) Just choose the version that fits the system you’ll be using, pick your language, and click go to register for and download the RC.

Downloading the Windows 7 RC could take a few hours. The exact time will depend on your provider, bandwidth, and traffic. The good news is that once you start the download, you won’t have to answer any more questions – you can walk away while it finishes. If your download gets interrupted, it will restart where it left off. See this FAQ for details.

Existing TechNet Plus subscribers, download the Windows 7 RC software here. Not a subscriber yet? Learn more about TechNet Plus.
Select the Windows 7 RC version you want to download

Choose between the 32-bit and 64-bit versions, based on the version of Windows you are currently running and your machine’s hardware configuration. Each version is available in five languages: English, French, German, Japanese, and Spanish.

Download the 32-bit (x86) version: Select Your LanguageEnglishFrenchGermanJapaneseSpanish

Download the 64-bit (x64) version: Select Your LanguageEnglishFrenchGermanJapaneseSpanish

Information about Windows 7 is preliminary and subject to change. Some product features of Windows 7, such as the ability to watch and record live TV or navigation through the use of “touch,” may require advanced or additional hardware. The features and functionality you find in the pre-release product may not appear in the final version of Windows 7. If we change the software before it’s released, we’ll change this information accordingly. We’re not making express or implied warranties with this information.

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As expected, Microsoft will be handing out a pre-beta version of Windows 7 during the PDC2008 conference to all its attendees, on an external 160GB hard drive. However, it’s likely that after the PDC ends, Microsoft will make Windows 7 available to a larger group of beta testers.

Microsoft shows excitement over the release of its pre-beta version of Windows 7 at the end of October during the PDC2008 conference in Los Angeles.

“We’ll [...] be giving every attendee a pre-beta copy of Windows 7. Yes, you heard that right. You’ll be able to install your own copy of Windows 7 and play with it on your hardware. This is a very limited release, and PDC2008 attendees will be the first to get it.” said Mike Swanson, a well known technical evangelist at Microsoft. Mike also announced there will be 17 additional Windows 7 sessions during the PDC, and even more are expected to come. Some of the newly introduced sessions include ”Integrate with the Windows 7 Desktop Taskbar,” “New APIs to Find, Visualize and Organize,” and “Best Practices for Developing for Windows Standard User.”

Steven Sinofsky, one of the writers behind the Engineering Windows 7 blog and a senior engineer manager at Microsoft, will be also present at the PDC to hold a keynote on Windows 7 and answer questions. Sinofsky will also be seen at WinHEC where he’ll hold the keynote speach on Windows 7 on November 5.

The new operating system will be distributed on an external 160GB USB hard drive by Western Digital.

 

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Microsoft has announced that the final, official name of the next version of Windows will be the same as the codename – Windows 7 – making this the first version of Windows to keep its codename as its release name.

The codename Windows 7 has turned out to be more than just a codename this time around for Microsoft, as the company has agreed to keep things simple and keep the name Windows 7 for the final release of the operating system as well.

As Mike Nash, corporate vice president of Windows Product Management puts it:

“The decision to use the name Windows 7 is about simplicity. Over the years, we have taken different approaches to naming Windows. We’ve used version numbers like Windows 3.11, or dates like Windows 98, or “aspirational” monikers like Windows XP or Windows Vista. And since we do not ship new versions of Windows every year, using a date did not make sense. Likewise, coming up with an all-new “aspirational” name does not do justice to what we are trying to achieve, which is to stay firmly rooted in our aspirations for Windows Vista, while evolving and refining the substantial investments in platform technology in Windows Vista into the next generation of Windows.”

This is the first time a Windows version has used its codename also as the name of the final release, and also one of the earliest naming announcements from Microsoft, as Windows 7 hasn’t even reached its first beta version. A pre-beta will be handed out to attendees of the PDC and WinHEC conferences taking place later this month.

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Microsoft has announced that the final, official name of the next version of Windows will be the same as the codename – Windows 7 – making this the first version of Windows to keep its codename as its release name.

The codename Windows 7 has turned out to be more than just a codename this time around for Microsoft, as the company has agreed to keep things simple and keep the name Windows 7 for the final release of the operating system as well.

As Mike Nash, corporate vice president of Windows Product Management puts it:

“The decision to use the name Windows 7 is about simplicity. Over the years, we have taken different approaches to naming Windows. We’ve used version numbers like Windows 3.11, or dates like Windows 98, or “aspirational” monikers like Windows XP or Windows Vista. And since we do not ship new versions of Windows every year, using a date did not make sense. Likewise, coming up with an all-new “aspirational” name does not do justice to what we are trying to achieve, which is to stay firmly rooted in our aspirations for Windows Vista, while evolving and refining the substantial investments in platform technology in Windows Vista into the next generation of Windows.”

This is the first time a Windows version has used its codename also as the name of the final release, and also one of the earliest naming announcements from Microsoft, as Windows 7 hasn’t even reached its first beta version. A pre-beta will be handed out to attendees of the PDC and WinHEC conferences taking place later this month.

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At WinHEC, Microsoft demoed the new multitouch capabilities that come with Windows 7 with the support of N-trig (a popular producer of touchscreen displays) who has already released the first multitouch-enabling drivers for Windows 7.

The multitouch capabilities of Windows 7 were demoed at WinHEC this year, showing how Windows 7 makes tablet PCs and other touch-enabled devices much easier to use. Among the applications demoed, there was Virtual Earth, Microsoft Paint, Microsoft Word and Microsoft Worldwide Telescope.


Windows 7 drivers for the multitouch displays found in Dell Latitude XT Tablet PCs have already been released by N-trig, the producer of the touchscreens for these devices. The drivers are in a pre-beta stage, running on a pre-beta version of Windows 7, therefore bugs are common and expected.

“Working with Microsoft, we are building the infrastructure that is fueling HOC innovation in the PC marketplace,” said Amihai Ben David, CEO of N-trig. “With this foundation in place, ISVs can now create new applications to further enhance the usability and reduce the barriers between people and computers. Additionally, these software advancements give OEMs a high level of interactivity for a dynamic interface that will open up further avenues for development.”

“We’re excited to bring multi-touch to Windows 7 to create a unique experience for customers to easily search for information, navigate web pages and locate files all at their fingertips,” said Gary Schare, Director of Hardware Ecosystem Product Management at Microsoft Corp. “N-trig’s DuoSense technology is key to enabling multi-touch experiences by allowing customers a natural way to interact directly with computing devices through a touch of a finger.”

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Information regarding the long awaited event for the launch of Windows 7 has been released; online registration is available, and attendees are being rewarded with a free copy of Windows 7.

“The New Efficiency” is the name that Microsoft has adopted for its 3-in-one launch event, where it plans to introduce individuals and businesses to 3 new products: Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2 and Exchange Server 2010.


The event is set to run in 25 different locations across the United States, September 24 through November 9. Anyone can sign up at Microsoft’s Business website and choose to attend various event tracks for developers and IT professionals. The seats at these events get occupied fairly quickly, particularly because of the free copy of Windows 7 incentive, thus reserving early is a good idea.

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The Windows 7 team is taking the performance of the new operating system seriously, at the request of its consumers. The blog discusses what Microsoft is doing to achieve a new level of performance.

The Engineering Windows 7 blog has recognized the interest of Windows consumers in the improved performance of the new operating system, and two new posts have been dedicated to covering the subject.

According to the blog, the Windows 7 teams are constantly watching the memory usage, CPU usage, disk operations, boot, shutdown, standby and resume time, among other metrics. They are also working on improving device driver performance, network performance and boot performance. A very fast boot would be 15 seconds or less, and the Windows team is working towards getting more systems to achieve that performance with Windows 7 – while keeping in mind that obviously the hardware plays an important factor.

The measurements are done on a wide range of hardware platforms, with various amounts of RAM, hard-disks and solid-state disks, 32 bit and 64 bit processors. The Windows operating system also uses conditional statements that target different code depending on the available hardware.

Furthermore, the Fundamentals Team’s primary objective is to improve the performance of Windows 7 and Internet Explorer 8. Aside from that, a single team of developers has been assigned the task of increasing the boot performance of the operating system. Tests are being done in a benchmark lab that allow to track and compare different versions of the Windows 7 code.

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Dec/12

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Why The Name Change?

Many were wondering why Microsoft decided to change the codename of the future version of Windows from Blackcomb to Vienna. Bruce Morgan from Microsoft, expresses his personal opinion.

Many were wondering why Microsoft decided to change the codename of the future version of Windows from Blackcomb to Vienna. Bruce Morgan from Microsoft, expresses his personal opinion:

“Blackcomb was the code name for some other project driven by other people, started many years ago. The people who chose that name and started that have moved around quite a bit since then, and different people have the leadership roles now. The vision for the product is quite a bit different, I’d imagine, than in the late 90s. So many things are different now that it’s been many years since Blackcomb was the “next version of Windows after Whistler.”

 

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