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Archive for December 2012

The Windows 7 team is taking the performance of the new operating system seriously, at the request of its consumers. The blog discusses what Microsoft is doing to achieve a new level of performance.

The Engineering Windows 7 blog has recognized the interest of Windows consumers in the improved performance of the new operating system, and two new posts have been dedicated to covering the subject.

According to the blog, the Windows 7 teams are constantly watching the memory usage, CPU usage, disk operations, boot, shutdown, standby and resume time, among other metrics. They are also working on improving device driver performance, network performance and boot performance. A very fast boot would be 15 seconds or less, and the Windows team is working towards getting more systems to achieve that performance with Windows 7 – while keeping in mind that obviously the hardware plays an important factor.

The measurements are done on a wide range of hardware platforms, with various amounts of RAM, hard-disks and solid-state disks, 32 bit and 64 bit processors. The Windows operating system also uses conditional statements that target different code depending on the available hardware.

Furthermore, the Fundamentals Team’s primary objective is to improve the performance of Windows 7 and Internet Explorer 8. Aside from that, a single team of developers has been assigned the task of increasing the boot performance of the operating system. Tests are being done in a benchmark lab that allow to track and compare different versions of the Windows 7 code.

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Dec/12

9

Why The Name Change?

Many were wondering why Microsoft decided to change the codename of the future version of Windows from Blackcomb to Vienna. Bruce Morgan from Microsoft, expresses his personal opinion.

Many were wondering why Microsoft decided to change the codename of the future version of Windows from Blackcomb to Vienna. Bruce Morgan from Microsoft, expresses his personal opinion:

“Blackcomb was the code name for some other project driven by other people, started many years ago. The people who chose that name and started that have moved around quite a bit since then, and different people have the leadership roles now. The vision for the product is quite a bit different, I’d imagine, than in the late 90s. So many things are different now that it’s been many years since Blackcomb was the “next version of Windows after Whistler.”

 

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Julie Larson-Green, responsible for the user interface of Office 2007, and also the person behind the ribbon-like interface has been transferred to the Windows 7 team.

Julie Larson-Green, responsible for the user interface of Office 2007, and also the person behind the ribbon-like interface has been transferred to the Windows 7 team.

The current release date of the Windows 7 operating system is expected to be in late 2009, early 2010, returning to the 3-year pause between desktop operating system versions that was common at Microsoft for all Windows versions prior to Windows Vista.

The most common dilema about Windows 7 right now is whether or not to use backward compatibility. Strong rumours have suggested that the OS will be developed from scratch on top of the Windows NT kernel, given its maturity in both security and stability terms. The backward compatibility, however, is something that Microsoft developers would frown upon, since it prevents truly revolutional ideas to be implemented. Windows Vista, because of its backward compatibile, carries a large amount of code libraries with it, thus the large size of the operating system. However, many businesses that haven’t upgraded their software in a decade or more would not purchase Windows 7 if it was not compatible with their applications. As a result, the current options that Microsoft has are to either make Windows 7 backward compatible, or to maintain a legacy version of Windows in parallel, for the business customers, one which will be kept alive by Microsoft though patches and updates.

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